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The Glasgow Canals Regeneration

Redevelopment of the Glasgow branch of the Forth & Clyde Canal

as a regeneration strategy (2006)

Introduction

The Forth & Clyde canal was designed by John Smeaton, with the aim of becoming a logistic backbone for the manufacturing economy of Scotland, connecting both Eastern and Western Sides of the island. Construction started in 1768 and was completed in 1790. The Union Canal was then constructed to link the eastern end of the canal to Edinburgh. During the motorway expansion in the 1960s a section of the canal was closed and so it became disused and semi-derelict. Canal locks in the Falkirk area on the Union Canal near the connection to the Forth and Clyde canal had been filled in and built over in the 1930s.

The Millennium Link

Project

In 2001 the canal was triumphantly re-opened as part of the £83.5m Millennium Link project - the largest canal restoration anywhere in Britain. The project incorporated the construction of the iconic Falkirk Wheel. When opened in June 2002 the Wheel reconnected the Forth & Clyde and Union Canals for the first time in over 70 years. The next challenge is to extend the regeneration success of the canal to the cities directly benefited by its impact, such as Glasgow.

Glasgow Canals Regeneration

The Glasgow Canal Regeneration Partnership was established to dedicate resources and to revitalise the wider north Glasgow area under influence of the canal, an area that suffers some of the worst socio-economic conditions in Western Europe. One of the goals of the Glasgow Canal Regeneration Partnership is to invest several million pounds on extending the Canal into Port Dundas, together with complementing environmental relieve programmes around the Canal system.

Historic and representative sites along the Canal

Sites and Historic Buildings H1 Maryhill Locks, Kelvinfock and Boatyard H2 Whitehouse Inn, former Maryhill post office H3 Kelvinhall Papermills, today a bird wildlife hotspot H4 historic bridge structures along Canal and River Kelvin, mainly railway infrastructure H5 Maryhill Burgh Halls, former Maryhill city Hall H6 Stop Lock: Structure built to reduce flooding risks as a result of air strike during WW2 H7 Ruchhill golf course redesigned with recycled silt during canal dredging H8 Canal Spillway for water level control H9 Charles Reniee Mackintosh's Ruchhill Church Hall from 1899 H10 Industrial Heritage Glasgow Lead and Colour Works H11 East Park School (1874) H12 Bilsland Drive Aqueduct H13 Wildlife hotspots Western Saw Mills and Hamiltonhill Claypits H14 Mackintosh Queen's Cross Church (from 1899) H15 Applecross Workshops (early 1800s), oldest canal buildings in Scotland H16 The Whisky Bond, former Mushroom factory, today a creative industries complex H17 Industrial Heritage Site Speirs Wharf, revitalised in the 1990s to residential use H18 intustrial site (underused) Port Dundas H19 restored railway swing bridge and bascule bridge

Connectivity Analysis

  In terms of connectivity the Motorway M8 and the Canal (only six cross-points in impact area) have been a barrier between communities and boroughs, with the city council not being able to trade off this deficit with public transportation services. The reduced spare capacity of main arteries along the canal need attention, as they would not bear a radical increase of residential and commercial density. The existing use and additional potential for cycling and walking along the canal is unmistakable.

Analysis of Current Landuse

The closure of the Canal during the 1960s reflected a decreasing attractiveness of the North Glasgow  area. The underused sites along the (now restored) waterway, together with parks and green areas  have since then enabled a unique environment, which combines historic water engineering, industrial  heritage and wildlife nature. The Local Development Strategy (LDS)  developed after this study recognises the canal as a 'Corridor of Wildlife & Landscape Importance' and demands a balanced approach to develop it as a strategic corridor and a public space for all Glasgow residents. The LDS will also search in the canal impact zone the opportunity to respond to the current demand for new housing within the City, establishing balanced communities and an appropriate range of community facilities. The scheme design developed in the first phase of the study is enclosed here by a white hidden line. It is explained in the following pages. Proposed Scheme

Port Dundas

The area of Port Dundas is located just 15 minutes walk time from Glasgow's city centre. It has a subway station just south of the M8 motorway stripe and several bus lines in direct vicinity. It has been historically an industrial site, established between 1786 and 1790 and named after Sir Lawrence Dundas, a major backer of the Forth and Clyde Canal Company. During the operation of the Monkland Canal and the Glasgow Branch of the Forth and Clyde Canal, Port Dundas would accommodate textile mills, chemical works, granaries, distilleries, glassworks, iron foundries, one of the first power stations in Glasgow and engineering works. Some of the infrastructure had outstanding dimensions, such as the Towsend brick chimney (130m, the tallest in the world at the time) and the 1954 built cooling tower for the electricity plant, which was the largest in Europe at the time. Most of these ancient buildings have been demolished, including the Port Dundas distillery, which was dismantled in 2010 and shifted to Gorgie, Edinburgh. The urban solution proposed here suggests a mixed regeneration which combines passive design, historic conservation of buildings and sites and low emission mobility in a permeable layout. The identity of the site is represented through the refurbished canal, use of industrial heritage and reinstalling some functions in a sustainable design strategy.

Speirs Wharf

Speirs Wharf was originally owned by the Forth & Clyde Navigation Co., where administration offices operated as well as the City of Glasgow Grain Mills and Stores, built in 1851 for John Currie & Co. As early as 1989 the buildings were converted into 150 lofts for residential use. The complex includes today a leisure centre and 19 commercial units. Speirs Wharf is no doubt an impressive landmark today. Because of its elevated location it is visible from most of the Glasgow city centre and it offers impressive views of the Glasgow skyline. It represents a pioneering development in the area and has established a community with a strong participation will on future issues of the area. The proposed development which surrounds Speirs Wharf focuses on mobility, identity and activity with and along the canal. It shall develop complementary functions with the existing Speirs Wharf complex, in a strategic mix of urban design solutions which support the sustainable growth of the entire community.
URBAN REGENERATION
© 2006 - 2015 Systemarchi

The Glasgow Canals

Regeneration

Redevelopment of the

Glasgow branch of the Forth

& Clyde Canal as a

regeneration strategy (2006)

Introduction

The Forth & Clyde canal was designed by John Smeaton, with the aim of becoming a logistic backbone for the manufacturing economy of Scotland, connecting both Eastern and Western Sides of the island. Construction started in 1768 and was completed in 1790. The Union Canal was then constructed to link the eastern end of the canal to Edinburgh. During the motorway expansion in the 1960s a section of the canal was closed and so it became disused and semi-derelict. Canal locks in the Falkirk area on the Union Canal near the connection to the Forth and Clyde canal had been filled in and built over in the 1930s.

The Millennium Link Project

In 2001 the canal was triumphantly re-opened as part of the £83.5m Millennium Link project - the largest canal restoration anywhere in Britain. The project incorporated the construction of the iconic Falkirk Wheel. When opened in June 2002 the Wheel reconnected the Forth & Clyde and Union Canals for the first time in over 70 years. The next challenge is to extend the regeneration success of the canal to the cities directly benefited by its impact, such as Glasgow.

Glasgow Canals Regeneration

The Glasgow Canal Regeneration Partnership was established to dedicate resources and to revitalise the wider north Glasgow area under influence of the canal, an area that suffers some of the worst socio-economic conditions in Western Europe. One of the goals of the Glasgow Canal Regeneration Partnership is to invest several million pounds on extending the Canal into Port Dundas, together with complementing environmental relieve programmes around the Canal system.

Historic and representative

sites along the Canal

Sites and Historic Buildings H1 Maryhill Locks, Kelvinfock and Boatyard H2 Whitehouse Inn, former Maryhill post office H3 Kelvinhall Papermills, today a bird wildlife hotspot H4 historic bridge structures along Canal and River Kelvin, mainly railway infrastructure H5 Maryhill Burgh Halls, former Maryhill city Hall H6 Stop Lock: Structure built to reduce flooding risks as a result of air strike during WW2 H7 Ruchhill golf course redesigned with recycled silt during canal dredging H8 Canal Spillway for water level control H9 Charles Reniee Mackintosh's Ruchhill Church Hall from 1899 H10 Industrial Heritage Glasgow Lead and Colour Works H11 East Park School (1874) H12 Bilsland Drive Aqueduct H13 Wildlife hotspots Western Saw Mills and Hamiltonhill Claypits H14 Mackintosh Queen's Cross Church (from 1899) H15 Applecross Workshops (early 1800s), oldest canal buildings in Scotland H16 The Whisky Bond, former Mushroom factory, today a creative industries complex H17 Industrial Heritage Site Speirs Wharf, revitalised in the 1990s to residential use H18 intustrial site (underused) Port Dundas H19 restored railway swing bridge and bascule bridge

Connectivity Analysis

  In terms of connectivity the Motorway M8 and the Canal (only six cross-points in impact area) have been a barrier between communities and boroughs, with the city council not being able to trade off this deficit with public transportation services. The reduced spare capacity of main arteries along the canal need attention, as they would not bear a radical increase of residential and commercial density. The existing use and additional potential for cycling and walking along the canal is unmistakable.

Analysis of Current Landuse

The closure of the Canal during the 1960s reflected a decreasing attractiveness of the North Glasgow  area. The underused sites along the (now restored) waterway, together with parks and green areas  have since then enabled a unique environment, which combines historic water engineering, industrial  heritage and wildlife nature. The Local Development Strategy (LDS)  developed after this study recognises the canal as a 'Corridor of Wildlife & Landscape Importance' and demands a balanced approach to develop it as a strategic corridor and a public space for all Glasgow residents. The LDS will also search in the canal impact zone the opportunity to respond to the current demand for new housing within the City, establishing balanced communities and an appropriate range of community facilities. The scheme design developed in the first phase of the study is enclosed here by a white hidden line. It is explained in the following pages. Proposed Scheme

Port Dundas

The area of Port Dundas is located just 15 minutes walk time from Glasgow's city centre. It has a subway station just south of the M8 motorway stripe and several bus lines in direct vicinity. It has been historically an industrial site, established between 1786 and 1790 and named after Sir Lawrence Dundas, a major backer of the Forth and Clyde Canal Company. During the operation of the Monkland Canal and the Glasgow Branch of the Forth and Clyde Canal, Port Dundas would accommodate textile mills, chemical works, granaries, distilleries, glassworks, iron foundries, one of the first power stations in Glasgow and engineering works. Some of the infrastructure had outstanding dimensions, such as the Towsend brick chimney (130m, the tallest in the world at the time) and the 1954 built cooling tower for the electricity plant, which was the largest in Europe at the time. Most of these ancient buildings have been demolished, including the Port Dundas distillery, which was dismantled in 2010 and shifted to Gorgie, Edinburgh. The urban solution proposed here suggests a mixed regeneration which combines passive design, historic conservation of buildings and sites and low emission mobility in a permeable layout. The identity of the site is represented through the refurbished canal, use of industrial heritage and reinstalling some functions in a sustainable design strategy.

Speirs Wharf

Speirs Wharf was originally owned by the Forth & Clyde Navigation Co., where administration offices operated as well as the City of Glasgow Grain Mills and Stores, built in 1851 for John Currie & Co. As early as 1989 the buildings were converted into 150 lofts for residential use. The complex includes today a leisure centre and 19 commercial units. Speirs Wharf is no doubt an impressive landmark today. Because of its elevated location it is visible from most of the Glasgow city centre and it offers impressive views of the Glasgow skyline. It represents a pioneering development in the area and has established a community with a strong participation will on future issues of the area. The proposed development which surrounds Speirs Wharf focuses on mobility, identity and activity with and along the canal. It shall develop complementary functions with the existing Speirs Wharf complex, in a strategic mix of urban design solutions which support the sustainable growth of the entire community.
URBAN REGENERATION
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