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Dalian East Harbour Regeneration

Proposal for the redevelopment of Dalian East Harbour under

consideration of Dalian’s Socio-Cultural and Historical Identity

Main Goal

Exploring the role of public space in improving the urban quality through applying socio-cultural and historic identity representation

Rationale

Because of the important relationship between community, society and culture, and the way how they determine shape and influence the public urban space, the analysis of this relationship is essential to understand their role in the East Harbour Development.

(1) What do we have?

Multicultural Past Dalian has a rich history that includes within the last two hundred years periods of time under British occupation, later periods under the Qing Dynasty, the Russian Empire, Japanese occupation, Chinese-Soviet co-administration and finally after the end of World War II its current role as one of the most important port cities of the People’s Republic of China. Each regime realized the importance of its location and invested huge resources in strengthening its infrastructure as a port and industrial centre. Today is Dalian the second largest international commercial harbour in China. In 2006 the city was rated as the “most liveable place in China” by the China Daily. Even though, many Dalianese do not consider the city their hometown because they cannot identify with the legacy of its colonial past. Demographic Development 2002 recorded Total Population 5,98 Mio Total urban Population 3,28 Mio Rate of Urbanisation 55% 2020 projected Total Population ~8 Mio Total urban Population ~6,8 Mio Rate of Urbanisation 85% Dalian is the most important port and commercial hub of the province Liaoling. China’s central government foresees the city growth towards the north of Dalian. Central Dalian and its most representative public squares. Dalian is renowned for its squares and green places. The East Harbour District (above right) is partly reclaimed land. Notice the large forest areas to the South, mostly covering mountainous terrain.

(2) What do we want?

Main Goals and Objectives It is a combination of various layers that provide a place an identity, which gives us the hints to create places with a sense of belonging and inclusiveness. Options are permeability, legibility and authenticity for creating a place that belongs to the city. Dalian hosts a history of a multicultural past and is as a harbour city a bridge from China to the world. A first analysis identified the importance of combining the elements culture, social identity and history.

(3) How to get there

Strategy 1: Liveability Public spaces should provide opportunities for locals to perform there a wide range of activities. Strategy 2: Personification To look for reflecting identity through public art/ landmarks for the city. Genuine elements with local intervention. Strategy 3: Interaction To provide an interactive environment between people and the public space. Strategy 4: Imageability Adapting the image of the place to the activities and needs of citizens, and to the new skyline of the city. Strategy 5: Permeability It proposes to open up the public space and waterfront for all citizens without discrimination, making harbour and public areas a space for inclusive interaction and amenity. This includes measures such as more open areas in ground floor level, height restrictions, increasing mobility space for pedestrians and non motorized vehicles, increasing the public accessible shore. The connection of the East Harbour with the existing port will benefit from this strategy. Strategy 6: Bridging To incorporate the existing port infrastructure as a historical ensemble in the new developments, as a bridge between the future East Harbour and its history through architecture, landscape, public arts and use. Example: Dalian Zhongshan Park, a former military building during Japanese occupation, it is today a community centre for the elderly. It shows a positive attitude towards history. New fevelopments should have a sane density with mixed uses and provide space for relax and amenity in common areas. Underused harbour infrastructure may be conserved and adapted to new uses. They describe the identity of the site and provide a unique image of the new Dalian East Harbour.

Current Landuse

The development zone is currently attractive for commercial and business activity. Current proposals include high rise towers on the west end of the site which shall provide office space, hotels and high end apartments. We perceive the need to include green and amenity space, public infrastructure and medium density residential space in the area, which should as well primarily have a mixed fabric. The municipality has recently opened a new metro line that connects the East Harbour development zone with the rest of Dalian. Two Metro stations serve the area.

Proposed Scheme

The proposed scheme responds to the need to provide attractive development areas for residential use and business activity, and add a sensible mix of service areas, commercial facilities, green and leisure, as well as good quality public infrastructure. The mobility scheme includes a twofold network of roads for motorized vehicles and paths for pedestrian, cycling and non motorized vehicles. The main goal of the green paths is to allow clean and fast connectivity between the most concurred sites in the area, contributing to reduce congestion and emissions. Permeability and a positive approach towards sharing of high quality public space (coastline, paths, parks) is a key element in the scheme. This is combined with a high density of endemic vegetation cover, which contributes to reduce energy use for heating in winter (wind barriers) and air conditioning in summer (shadow and moisture cooling). Last but not least, the scheme conserves traces of the former industrial character of the area. Some factory infrastructure has been adapted to incorporate commercial or public infrastructure and reflect the historical identity of the area. Key for implementation: Participation is essential to create a “place for Dalian with Dalian”, letting Dalianese give their meaning to public urban space and to make Dalian a city for all. Concluding Remarks We as planners have to give locals the grounds to keeping the ever evolving city authentic and to relate urban form and society. Dalian’s public spaces have to reflect a true local identity or association. East Harbour has the resources to develop without compromising Dalians authenticity: to represent who Dalian locals are as a whole and letting visitors feel that they are in a unique place. Credits The Cultural Identity Analysis was elaborated by Divya Chopra, Li Fan, Ceelia Leong, Yi Xiaofeng, Rolf Schuett and Zeynep Günay during an Isocarp Young Planners Workshop on site in September 2008. The scheme design is based on the results of this work.
URBAN REGENERATION
© 2006 - 2015 Systemarchi

Dalian East Harbour

Regeneration

Proposal for the

redevelopment of Dalian East

Harbour under consideration

of Dalian’s Socio-Cultural and

Historical Identity

Main Goal

Exploring the role of public space in improving the urban quality through applying socio- cultural and historic identity representation

Rationale

Because of the important relationship between community, society and culture, and the way how they determine shape and influence the public urban space, the analysis of this relationship is essential to understand their role in the East Harbour Development.

(1) What do we have?

Multicultural Past Dalian has a rich history that includes within the last two hundred years periods of time under British occupation, later periods under the Qing Dynasty, the Russian Empire, Japanese occupation, Chinese-Soviet co- administration and finally after the end of World War II its current role as one of the most important port cities of the People’s Republic of China. Each regime realized the importance of its location and invested huge resources in strengthening its infrastructure as a port and industrial centre. Today is Dalian the second largest international commercial harbour in China. In 2006 the city was rated as the “most liveable place in China” by the China Daily. Even though, many Dalianese do not consider the city their hometown because they cannot identify with the legacy of its colonial past. Demographic Development 2002 recorded Total Population 5,98 Mio Total urban Population 3,28 Mio Rate of Urbanisation 55% 2020 projected Total Population ~8 Mio Total urban Population ~6,8 Mio Rate of Urbanisation 85% Dalian is the most important port and commercial hub of the province Liaoling. China’s central government foresees the city growth towards the north of Dalian. Central Dalian and its most representative public squares. Dalian is renowned for its squares and green places. The East Harbour District (above right) is partly reclaimed land. Notice the large forest areas to the South, mostly covering mountainous terrain.

(2) What do we want?

Main Goals and Objectives It is a combination of various layers that provide a place an identity, which gives us the hints to create places with a sense of belonging and inclusiveness. Options are permeability, legibility and authenticity for creating a place that belongs to the city. Dalian hosts a history of a multicultural past and is as a harbour city a bridge from China to the world. A first analysis identified the importance of combining the elements culture, social identity and history.

(3) How to get there

Strategy 1: Liveability Public spaces should provide opportunities for locals to perform there a wide range of activities. Strategy 2: Personification To look for reflecting identity through public art/ landmarks for the city. Genuine elements with local intervention. Strategy 3: Interaction To provide an interactive environment between people and the public space. Strategy 4: Imageability Adapting the image of the place to the activities and needs of citizens, and to the new skyline of the city. Strategy 5: Permeability It proposes to open up the public space and waterfront for all citizens without discrimination, making harbour and public areas a space for inclusive interaction and amenity. This includes measures such as more open areas in ground floor level, height restrictions, increasing mobility space for pedestrians and non motorized vehicles, increasing the public accessible shore. The connection of the East Harbour with the existing port will benefit from this strategy. Strategy 6: Bridging To incorporate the existing port infrastructure as a historical ensemble in the new developments, as a bridge between the future East Harbour and its history through architecture, landscape, public arts and use. Example: Dalian Zhongshan Park, a former military building during Japanese occupation, it is today a community centre for the elderly. It shows a positive attitude towards history. New fevelopments should have a sane density with mixed uses and provide space for relax and amenity in common areas. Underused harbour infrastructure may be conserved and adapted to new uses. They describe the identity of the site and provide a unique image of the new Dalian East Harbour.

Current Landuse

The development zone is currently attractive for commercial and business activity. Current proposals include high rise towers on the west end of the site which shall provide office space, hotels and high end apartments. We perceive the need to include green and amenity space, public infrastructure and medium density residential space in the area, which should as well primarily have a mixed fabric. The municipality has recently opened a new metro line that connects the East Harbour development zone with the rest of Dalian. Two Metro stations serve the area.

Proposed Scheme

The proposed scheme responds to the need to provide attractive development areas for residential use and business activity, and add a sensible mix of service areas, commercial facilities, green and leisure, as well as good quality public infrastructure. The mobility scheme includes a twofold network of roads for motorized vehicles and paths for pedestrian, cycling and non motorized vehicles. The main goal of the green paths is to allow clean and fast connectivity between the most concurred sites in the area, contributing to reduce congestion and emissions. Permeability and a positive approach towards sharing of high quality public space (coastline, paths, parks) is a key element in the scheme. This is combined with a high density of endemic vegetation cover, which contributes to reduce energy use for heating in winter (wind barriers) and air conditioning in summer (shadow and moisture cooling). Last but not least, the scheme conserves traces of the former industrial character of the area. Some factory infrastructure has been adapted to incorporate commercial or public infrastructure and reflect the historical identity of the area. Key for implementation: Participation is essential to create a “place for Dalian with Dalian”, letting Dalianese give their meaning to public urban space and to make Dalian a city for all. Concluding Remarks We as planners have to give locals the grounds to keeping the ever evolving city authentic and to relate urban form and society. Dalian’s public spaces have to reflect a true local identity or association. East Harbour has the resources to develop without compromising Dalians authenticity: to represent who Dalian locals are as a whole and letting visitors feel that they are in a unique place. Credits The Cultural Identity Analysis was elaborated by Divya Chopra, Li Fan, Ceelia Leong, Yi Xiaofeng, Rolf Schuett and Zeynep Günay during an Isocarp Young Planners Workshop on site in September 2008. The scheme design is based on the results of this work.
URBAN REGENERATION
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